Air Force Dads

Marty and Chrisit, these are the things allowed and not allowed in Navy boot camp. I would think it would apply to the Air Force as well.

The following is a list of items that you must bring to boot camp and are allowed to keep during training:

A. Photo I.D./ Drivers License
B. Social Security Card.
C. Marriage Certificate (if applicable).
D. Divorce Decree (if applicable).
E. Copies of Dependents Birth Certificate (if applicable).
F. Complete civilian and military immunization records.
G. Direct Deposit System form with bank account and routing number information.

These are items that you may bring with you to boot camp:

1. Wrist watch, wedding ring.
2. Religious medallion (No larger than the size of a dog tag).
3. Writing material (NO bottled ink).
4. Pocket dictionary.
5. Pocket bible.
6. Small address book.
7.Hairbrush and comb.
8. Pre-paid phone cards.
9. One pair of prescription glasses, reading glasses or contacts (with one week of cleaning solution).
10. A small amount of cash (i.e. less than $25).

Female recruits may retain the following personal items:

1. Feminine sanitary items.
2.Conservative cosmetics. Female/one each of face powder, blush, lipstick, eye shadow, and mascara (non-aerosol or glass) Make-up will be authorized for division photos and graduation weekend only.
3. Barrettes (Female/must match hair color).
4. Six white sports bras and two white full cup bras.
5. Six plain white cotton briefs (No lace).
6. One conservative, solid color (blue or black) one-piece swimsuit.
7. Birth control medications.

The following items are UNAUTHORIZED to be possessed by recruits in training:

food, candy, chewing gum or alcoholic beverages;
cigarettes or other tobacco products;
sharp objects, scissors, fingernail files or manicure kits;
lighter fluid, non-disposable lighters, matches, aerosol cans, perfumes, colognes, liquid shoe polish or any articles in glass containers;
radios, books, tape recorders, non-prescription or prescription sunglasses, musical instruments, sports equipment or cameras;
firearms, explosives, ammunition, knives or weapons of any kind;
calculators or electronic games;
lewd or obscene photographs or literature;
cards or dice;
non-prescription medicine, drugs or vitamins;
low-cut or two-piece swimsuits;
illegal drugs or drug paraphernalia;
Jewelry (except for a small religious medal, wedding and/or engagement ring and a conventional, conservative watch). While in uniform you're not allowed to wear any other jewelry.

What To Expect When Your Child Arrives:

Upon arrival, new recruits are required to go DIRECTLY to the USO office and check in with the military staff member present. The USO office and lounge is located in Terminal 2, Main Floor, Upper Level Office Spaces (office spaces are located above the airline ticket counters). You can see the USO office from the Chicago Police Booth located just prior to exiting the lobby area. Stairs are located at either door 2B or 2C.

After arriving at the USO, the staff member will give you instructions and an opportunity to eat if it is not too late. Most new arrivals are given meals en route to O'Hare Airport or during layovers. Whenever possible, you must eat PRIOR to arriving at O'Hare Airport.


Recruit training, or "boot camp," will be approximately 8 weeks long.
The goal of this training is to transform your child from a civilian into a Sailor with all of the skills necessary to perform in the fleet. Their training will include physical fitness, seamanship, firearms, firefighting and shipboard damage control, lessons in the Navy's heritage and core values, teamwork, and discipline. Their training will be challenging but highly rewarding.

Views: 76

Replies to This Discussion

Also a great idea is to send them off with an address book with all the names and address's of people they would like to send letters to in it. A journal, to write of their experience, a pre paid phone call, to call home, 25 dollars in cash, (that will be enough). As soon as your child leaves for boot camp start writing letters and number them in order. They hold the recruits mail until they earn the right to receive it, so numbering them will help your recruit to know where to start. If I think of some more I'll pass them along.
Thanks E. G.!! That's a great checklist and you've passed along some very helpful ideas. I never would have thought about numbering our letters to him. Thank you! And the address book and journal also are great ideas. I wonder, would there be restrictions about the size of an address book and/or journal? I'm guessing anything larger than 5 x 7 would be unnecessarily large. But is that too big?....Thanks for your help and support! I can't imagine doing this in the dark ages before online support groups!!!
~ christi

E.G. said:
Also a great idea is to send them off with an address book with all the names and address's of people they would like to send letters to in it. A journal, to write of their experience, a pre paid phone call, to call home, 25 dollars in cash, (that will be enough). As soon as your child leaves for boot camp start writing letters and number them in order. They hold the recruits mail until they earn the right to receive it, so numbering them will help your recruit to know where to start. If I think of some more I'll pass them along.

RSS

Our Mission Statement:

Provide support, encouragement, and knowledge to Airmen and their families throughout their journey together in the United States Air Force

Badge

Loading…

Members

© 2018   Created by Sgt Terry (Network Creator).   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service

AirForceDads.com is a private web community of Air Force Parents, Family Members, and Air Force supporters. It is not affiliated with the US Air Force.